Christology

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From the intro to my blogpost one year ago…

Out of the raging inferno of several centuries of conflict and polemics, orthodox Christian theology and Christology emerged. The Nicene Council in 325 A.D. concluded that Jesus was very God, of one substance with the Father and with the Holy Spirit. There was one God in three persons, one Being of substance yet three personalities. It was the person of the Word of God who had become incarnate, lived, suffered, died, resurrected, and ascended. This was the teaching of the deity of Christ, the foundation of theology. Later, the Council of Chalcedon in 451 A.D. concluded that Jesus was both God and man, very God and very man, not part God and part man, but all God and all man at the same time. This was the teaching of the two natures of Christ, the foundation of orthodox Christology…

With these clear and irrefutable teachings in place in the church for over fourteen hundred years, how is it that a large part of the church today has virtually denied the historical Jesus in favor of the cosmic Christ? How is it that Jesus is hardly thought of as a Jew who lived his entire life in the midst of his fellow Israelis? How is it that we have so many different conceptions of Jesus, including the Nordic, Aryan Jesus with blonde hair and blue eyes, the African Jesus with black skin and hair like wool, the oriental Jesus with oriental features? And, these are only the Christian versions. What of the Jesus who is portrayed as a first-rate medium by the consciousness philosophers, who is one of the many incarnations of God in Eastern Monism, who is another of the prophets leading up to the prophet Mohammed in Islam, who is the healer of Christian Scientism, who is a rabbi among many Jews, who is the great moral example in nominal Christianity? Every religion and philosophy wants to claim Jesus for its own purposes and to create him in its own image. If we are to understand Jesus, however, we must accept the record of Holy Scripture that places him and his sayings in the historical and cultural milieu in which he was born, lived, died, resurrected, and ascended. – John D. Garr, Our Lost Legacy: Christianity’s Hebrew Heritage

Source: Job 9, 10, 11